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VOTING RESOURCES & ASSISTANCE

TEXAS

(Pick a Different State)

Next Election: November 3, 2020

Last Day To Register: Oct. 5, 2020

Deadline to Return Absentee Ballot: Nov. 3, 2020, 7:00 PM

October 28, 2020: Judge Jason Pulliam, of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, temporarily invalidated an exemption for polling places in Governor Greg Abbott's (R) statewide mask mandate, requiring most voters to wear masks when voting in person.

October 12, 2020: A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit unanimously upheld a directive by Texas Governor Greg Abbott (R) restricting the number of absentee/mail-in ballot return locations to one per county.

October 10, 2020: A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit stayed Pitman's order, reinstating Gov. Greg Abbott's (R) directive restricting the number of absentee/mail-in ballot return locations to one per county.

October 9, 2020: Judge Robert Pitman, of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, blocked Gov. Greg Abbott's (R) directive restricting the number of absentee/mail-in ballot return locations to one per county.

October 1, 2020: Texas Governor Greg Abbott (R) issued a proclamation limiting the number of return locations for absentee/mail-in ballots to one per county.

September 28, 2020: A three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit temporarily stayed a lower court's order that had reinstated Texas' straight-ticket ballot device, pending further proceedings.

September 25, 2020: Judge Marina Marmolejo, of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, issued an order enjoining Texas officials from enforcing legislation that had rescinded the state's straight-ticket ballot option.

July 27, 2020: Gov. Greg Abbott (R) issued a proclamation extending the early voting period for the November 3, 2020, general election by six days. Originally scheduled to begin on October 19, 2020, early voting would instead open on October 13, 2020.

June 26, 2020: The Supreme Court of the United States declined to reinstate a district court order that had expanded absentee voting eligibility in Texas. An appeals court stayed the district court's order, a decision that was allowed to stand as a result of the Supreme Court's decision not to intervene.

Voter Guide

Every candidate and referendum in Texas, explained

Learning about candidates and referendums takes time but our system reduces that time and allows you to make a plan to vote. Simply enter your address and select the "Get Started" button.

Additional Voter Guides

2020 Presidential Election Voter Guide

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2020 Vice Presidential Election Voter Guide

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Texas Senate Election Voter Guide

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Party Platforms

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Plan Your Vote

Whether it's early or election day voting, voting in person or by mail, use our Plan Your Vote tool to find important information regarding crucial dates & times to submit your ballot, early voting & election day polling locations, and ballot drop-off locations, all specific to where you live. Simply type in your address below, select your address from the list presented, and then click the Get Started button.

Additional Voting Tools

Polling Location

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Register To Vote

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Absentee Requirements & Application

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Texas Absentee Requirement

Voters are eligible to vote absentee in an election if:

  • They cannot make it to the polls on Election Day because they will be away from the county on Election Day and during early voting;
  • They are sick or disabled;
  • They are 65 years of age or older; or
  • They are confined in jail.

Absentee Application

Registration Deadline & Requirements

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Texas Registration Deadline

  • In-Person: 30 days before Election Day.
  • By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day.
  • Online: N/A

Texas Registration Requirements

To register in Texas you must:

  • be a citizen of the United States
  • be a resident of the county in which the application for registration is made
  • be at least 17 years and 10 months old (you must be 18 to vote)
  • not be finally convicted of a felony, or if a convicted felon, you must have fully discharged your punishment, including any incarceration, parole, supervision, period of probation or be pardoned.
  • have not been declared mentally incompetent by final judgment of a court of law

State Resources

Texas Secretary of State

Receive Voting Reminders

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“Proclaim liberty throughout all the land to all its inhabitants.”
Leviticus 25:10 (Inscribed on the Liberty Bell)